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Topic: Kids With Manners


Mr. Brett

8/9/2018 10:01:43 AM
Member since:
Jul 2018
Total posts:61
Kids With Manners

So I just read on M.S.N. today about 10 "old-fashioned" manners kids do have today. Some of the ones that got me were calling adults by their last names, covering their mouth to cough or sneeze, setting the table, dressing up.  
So often these things are viewed (even decades ago), as the children's problem or short-coming, when always, it is the parents. Now, I'm a younger guy myself, but I don't agree one bit with any of this free-range, sugar-coated, "equality-for-all" parenting strategy of the millenials today.  
"Don't say 'Mr." or 'Mrs.', adults aren't superior, we're all equal". Get out of here. It's not about superiority levels, it's about respect. As kids, adults provide for us and build the world we will one day enter as adults ourselves. And to say that a simple 'Mr.' or 'Mrs.' is a sign that kids are less than adults and adults are the top of the food chain is immature and ridiculous. They've worked hard: they deserve it.  
And what's wrong with parents?! Teach your kids to wash their hands, and brush their teeth routinely. I've never seen so many kids at the dentist's. Cover your mouth, be polite. It's not old-fashioned. There's a huge difference between modernized equal thinking and plain classless and rude.  
As for setting a table. I got nothing. I was just floored to read that. How can a person not know. It's basically common sense. And for a parent to not teach them, it just goes to show what THEIR parents taught them for values.  
It always goes back to parents, and I'm just voicing my sorrow with the way the world is going.  
Thank-you

 
 
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Abbysmum

8/9/2018 10:40:04 AM
Member since:
Mar 2009
Total posts:3283
values

Some of those things you've listed isn't manners as much as a relfection of values and/or healthy habits.  
 
Covering a cough is a health issue, for example - something that goes beyond mere manners. So is brushing teeth.  
 
Calling an adult by "Mr or Mrs" is a values thing IMO - it's a way we show respect for the adults in our lives (I still call my parents' neighbours and friends "Mr & Mrs" even though I'm 40 years old!). Not that calling by the first name is inherently disrespectful, but it does differentiate peers from authority, which garners different levels of relating and respect. It's the same reason why we don't call our parents by their first names, even though there's nothing that really stops us from doing so.

sammy

8/9/2018 10:55:05 AM
Member since:
Sep 2010
Total posts:8263
..

The last name thing I’m 50/50 on. There are some elderly people in my life that I do not even know their first name because I’ve always referred to them as Mr or Mrs so and so. On the other hand, when I have a daycare family ask me what I want to be called by their child, I say “Sam” because I don’t want to be referred to as Ms such and such. I don’t find it disrespectful, it’s just what I prefer for myself  
 
I was just saying to my husband yesterday that I can’t believe how ALL the teens in our life are horrible at personal hygiene! I don’t ever remember going that phase. In fact, I said I think I’ve become lazier as I get older lol. When I was a teen I cared about what I looked like and smelled like hahaha

Mr. Brett

8/9/2018 11:12:08 AM
Member since:
Jul 2018
Total posts:61
Sammy

Well and that's exactly it. It certainly is a personal preference thing. Get called what you want.  
What I meant more was the assumption part of it. I got younger cousins still in school who reference to me "John", or "Jodi", and I say "Who?!". They'll say "Oh, my Math teacher", or whatever. Well, call them by 'Mr.', or 'Mrs.'. I can't imagine every teacher wants to go by their first name. Simply just don't do it from the start. Like with anyone I meet, I begin with formal, and move to more casual if told, or if the person, tone, attitude, and other factors are all right

foxtrot11

8/9/2018 12:39:56 PM
Member since:
Feb 2009
Total posts:2584
My kids

Are 13 and 17. I get constant comments from people that they are very courteous and we'll mannered kids. What's sad is often the people are shocked to see good manners in kids of their age.  
 
My kids were taught firm handshake, repeat the person's name when you greet them, if they are introduced as Mr or Mrs, that is what you use until asked otherwise. They were taught to give their own name as well, even if I have introduced them myself and Saud their name.  
They both always hold doors (yes, my daughter as well) for people.  
 
My kids also handwrite thank you cards for any gift given. I can't believe there is such a lack of proper thank you acknowledgement niw.  
 
I was invited to a wedding a couple of years ago for a first cousin. I was unable to attend but sent a gift from the registry. I never got a thank you card or any acknowledgement they had even received the gift. Found that pretty sad.

SuperheroAmongYou

8/9/2018 12:40:29 PM
Member since:
Nov 2017
Total posts:42
interesting

I always find these threads interesting. I am an older fogy myself, and whenever my "social" circle always talks about how lacking the generation who is following us is, I always have to ask the simple question "who raised that generation? And why are they not the ones who are taking the responsibility for the etiquette (or lack their of) of the generation that proceeds them? It is our responsibility as 1 generation to pass on the proper value and morals to those that follow us... if the ones who follow us don't have certain characteristics, then is it their fault? Or is it ours for not instilling it properly? When a child misbehaves we don't blame the child we always look at the parents. When young adults generally misbehave, do we look at them? Or the generation that is raising them? I get we are all our own person after a certain age, however these skills, morals and values should be instilled at a young age, so that these teens are properly equipped. If they are not, I don't think we should blame them, I think it was the responsibility of those who were obligated to teach them.... that being said, 1 generation is failing to properly equip the next, then should the generation that taught that middle generation should be help responsible? We could definitely go on and on ...

Fishin Guy

8/9/2018 1:35:53 PM
Member since:
Dec 2005
Total posts:6486
Hmmm.....

Wonder if same one about etiquette and manners  
 
1: Talking in person more via technology-This is totally true. Watch school yards and kids will form circles and talk to each other via cell phone. I hate texting. I will call a person up mid text and say screw the texting don’t have time to waste. If you want to ask someone how their day is it should be done either in person or via phone call. During school sending a text to mom or dad asking to go to a friends place is totally reasonable.  
 
2: Addressing adults by their first names-I would never want my child calling an adult by their first name. It was always Mr. or Mrs. So and so. If the adult was a very close family friend we could address them as Uncle and Auntie So and So. I don’t find it immature or ridiculous. My view is it is showing respect to someone older than you. Even at my ripe old age I will still address an elder as Mr. and Mrs. If you want to treat them as equals it makes no sense as they are not equal. Kids may have a say in things like what would you like for dinner or shopping ideas. House decisions, welfare of the child, etc. are all made by and adult as so should be treated.  
 
3: Standing for introductions-Do we stand up when we meet someone new. I have always been taught and teach to stand up and greet the person.  
 
4: Sitting down for family dinner-This is a tough one due to work schedules of both parents now usually work. We always when my daughter was younger and we had 8-5 jobs we would sit down to eat without technology at the table. It gave us the chance to detach from society for a brief hour and reflect with each other how our day went or upcoming events coming up.  
 
5: Setting the table. With more and more families having to work outside the home there are a lot that don’t actually sit with everyone at the table. When was the last time a restaurant actually set the table for you. Everything is in a rolled up napkin. With our busy lives it was great if my daughter was able to toss some plates on the table and put some cutlery out.  
 
6: Asking for Permission-This one I have a tough time with as my daughter seemed it was fine to do what she wanted when she wanted. Kids know they can do what they want and all parents can do is express their feelings of how it isn’t right do just do what they want. I used to get a smack on my behind….now I get slapped and the children get away with what they want. If I said she couldn’t do something she laughed and said “What am I going to do about it….she is doing it anyway.” Just look at the disrespect in schools now. Prime example but it is always the parents that get the short end of the stick.  
 
7: Not speaking unless spoken to-It is alright to voice an opinion or concern if at the right moment. I do like the point of children are taught not to interrupt, but allowed to make conversation without monopolizing it and to have opinions.  
 
8:Dressing up-This should be brought back. I don’t know why people need to wear jeans missing 2/3rds of the fabric when going out. Sure it is a style so wear some shorts. Covers just the same amount as the jean, sometimes more.  
 
9: Being cognizant of hygiene-I have always been told to cover my mouth, as I did the same with my daughter. Only difference now is remembering not to do it with my hands. Something we always did when younger. Then the germ thing came out of how your hands now need sanitizing as you are touching everything lol. Now it is cough in an elbow, shoulder, etc. If I see hand sanitizer I will always run a hand under it to keep the germs at bay.  
 
10: Writing thank you notes and handwritten letters-Seems the only time I write letters now is to my wife. Everything has been going commercialized and people have lost respect. I have read so many Dear Abby letters about wedding gift thank you notes not coming. Bride and groom claim to not have time yet had enough time to open the gift and use or spend it. Amazing how this seems. When we got gifts for birthdays and such a phone call is made giving thanks to those that live away.

traveller

8/9/2018 10:25:12 PM
Member since:
Jun 2007
Total posts:9059
:)

I have a different perspective. I dont really value any of those things op listed.  
 
I dont find it disrespectful to call a older person by their name so, i didnt teach my kids to use Mr and Ms, unless that is how they were introduced, i introduce myself to everyone including students of mine by my first name and expect they use it, tho i dont get offended if they call me whatever  
 
Setting the table is not how i do things at all, no value in that imo, everyone helps but i teach more then setting the table, we all chop, cook and clean together so when its ready everyone grabs what they need themselves then we sit down, no need to set anything, unlike days passed where Father[i/] sat and expected to be waited on, then when mother died he didnt have a clue how to set the table either lol  
 
dressing up is individual and rarely do circumstances warrant really fancy. I do get not looking like trash but at the same time years passed we spent a ton of money to dress up for what really? does it make me less of a person, less educated, not to have a suit? i dont think so  
 
washing themselves i do agree with but i have talked to some of my elders and all of them have said it was quite a common faze in teens. Going to the dentist is a good thing tho, more going means we are looking after our dental health better then before, not worse. Cant know you have an issue unless you get a professional in there can you?  
 
maybe im different but im not old, not young but I dont think its all sugar coating, which i dont agree with either, but raising kids differently, some of its good even tho its a change, years gone kids were to blindly listen and do what they are told, now they are allowed to have minds of their own, both good in different situations  
 
one thing i wish we would change (Im trying to) is the older generation thinking they are better then the next, each generation seems to change as we age we have to realize the changes arent all bad

Waitn' for the weekend

8/10/2018 1:48:03 AM
Member since:
Feb 2009
Total posts:221
I find it is slipping.

I have to constantly ask my nephews and neice to call me auntie. It is a sign of respect. And when they come over they never leave a spot for adults to sit so I end up sitting in the floor. They don't help with the table when they come to eat or clean up.  
 
They once they came over to specifically help my parents yard and the adults ended doing all the work.  
 
It all way that their bored because they the t.v is off and their is no video games. They don't know how to talk to their grandparents and talk. They try to to talk to the kids but they don't listen....

dancing_queen

8/10/2018 7:23:49 AM
Member since:
Jun 2007
Total posts:170
I see both

Living in town we have some great kids who respect our property, wave at us, ring our doorbell and are generally nice kids. We also have kids who come into our yard without asking, ride their bikes across our lawn and when they do want something they open our door without knocking or anything.  
 
I have teenage nieces and nephews who don't help with dishes, complain about what is "served" to them for dinner and younger ones who constantly yell/talk over the adults and interrupt for attention. Its frustrating because they can play or entertain themselves on a phone for hours without interacting but as soon as a group settles in for a visit they all of a sudden can't do anything but monopolize everyone.  
 
And as for the comments regarding hygiene, some of that has to be on the parents because a three year old having major dental surgery because their teeth are rotten hasn't had any hygiene for a long time and they are too young to do it by themselves. When I was a kid my parents would have been so mad if I had cavities from just being lazy. I understand there are all kinds of conditions that can cause poor teeth, but we had what the dentist called good teeth and my parents expected us to look after them!  
 
I also don't want to put all the blame on parents either as I see some really great parents who are doing their very best and occasionally their kids have a bad day. And sometimes I have to remind myself when I see kids I don't interact with often that maybe I'm catching them on a bad day. I know myself I have bad days, but I'm an adult and can hide them better than a five year old who can't or a teenager who is upset about something that in ten years they will look back on and realize it wasn't important. As the mature adult I feel that even if I am annoyed or embarrassed for the parents I have to respond in an appropriate way or ,I too am acting poorly.

SimplyTheBest

8/10/2018 8:22:11 AM
Member since:
May 2012
Total posts:144
Kids

I definitely agree that manners and common courtesy are important, however every family sees different things as important. One of my friends has their children call adults they are close to "Aunt" or "Uncle" whether the adult wants to be called that or not. I don't feel that is an important thing and I personally don't want to be called "Aunt" by a child who isn't actually my nephew or niece. My kids address adults how we are introduced to them and how the adult prefers to be addressed.  
 
I also agree with the point about timing. Kids do have bad days and sometimes what may seem like bad manners is simply a training moment and you aren't seeing the entire situation. For example, the other day while shopping my son wanted a specific toy. He had a fit when I said he couldn't have it, however we had to finish our shopping and I wasn't about to give in to a temper tantrum. It took about 5 minutes for him to calm down and he apologized to me and said he knows he shouldn't act like that. However, to someone that doesn't know us and sees us for the 5 minutes in the store while he's crying and mad, they would likely think he's a "bratty kid".  
 
As far as hygiene - that isn't a manners thing, that's a health thing, which in my opinion there is no excuse for not teaching. And in my opinion, seeing more kids at the dentist is a good thing. It means the parents are taking care of their kids teeth. My kids go regularly every 6 months to get a check up and have good, cavity free teeth.

acidbasement

8/10/2018 11:20:34 AM
Member since:
Aug 2011
Total posts:483

Respect is more than calling our elders Mr. or Mrs. Lastname - what does that have to do with anything? Respect is earned, and you have to do more than just get old and cranky to earn it. I tell kids to call me by my first name, and I'm not going to apologize for it.  
 
When I was a kid, racism, sexism, and homophobia were a lot more rampant than today, and that's pretty disrespectful, don't you think? Littering, drunk driving, smoking in restaurants, the list goes on.  
 
We are dooming our grandchildren by not dealing with climate change, and you expect them to revere us simply by virtue of the fact that we're older? How fragile is your ego?

myhandleistrain

8/10/2018 11:24:36 AM
Member since:
Mar 2016
Total posts:349
Good discussion

I too am from the era of calling elderly people Sir, Ma'am, and friends parents Mr. and Mrs., Although at 60, sadly I'm finding lesser and lesser people to say that to.

Abbysmum

8/10/2018 11:47:23 AM
Member since:
Mar 2009
Total posts:3283

  
acidbasement said "Respect is more than calling our elders Mr. or Mrs. Lastname - what does that have to do with anything? Respect is earned, and you have to do more than just get old and cranky to earn it. I tell kids to call me by my first name, and I'm not going to apologize for it.  
 
When I was a kid, racism, sexism, and homophobia were a lot more rampant than today, and that's pretty disrespectful, don't you think? Littering, drunk driving, smoking in restaurants, the list goes on.  
 
We are dooming our grandchildren by not dealing with climate change, and you expect them to revere us simply by virtue of the fact that we're older? How fragile is your ego? "

I don't think anyone is saying that respect is only calling someone Mr. or Mrs., but I'm of the firm belief that interior disposition should be reflected by exterior actions, and that our exterior actions influences our interior actions.  
 
As a Catholic, we have a saying, "lex orandi, lex credendi", or sometimes "lex orandi, lex credendi, lex vivendi". Roughly interpreted, it means how we worship is how we believe, which is turn is how is live. It reflects the relationship between what we have inside, on the outside, and how our actions are influenced by those things (not only in matters of religion, but can be extended to all things).  
 
I apply this to everyday life, as probably do most people. What I do on the outside is a direct result of what is on the inside. What I do on the outside influences who I am inside.  
 
Many years ago I had a good friend who was, using her words, "a cultural Jew". And yet, on the eve of the Shabbat, I watched as she went around her house preparing for it, and knelt and lit the candles at the appropriate time [sundown] and said prayers. I asked her why she did those things even though I knew she didn't really believe.  
 
She said that they are taught to do the external things because of the influence it has on the internal. And that someday they might believe, and then those external things are important.  
 
So the external niceties - saying please and thank-you, sir and ma'am, and being generally respectful of others not only in actions but in words - have an influence on internal disposition. Will kids go to hell in a handbasket because there are adults in their lives they call by their first names (usually with the adult's express permission)? An emphatic "no".  
 
But in children, the expectation lays the first foundations of being respectful and seeing the dignity of all people. It's something that can be built upon.

acidbasement

8/10/2018 12:01:45 PM
Member since:
Aug 2011
Total posts:483

I guess what I was going for was that respect is more than "manners". Kids today may be more likely to call you a familiar name, as opposed to Mr. or Mrs., but they are also a lot more courteous than previous generations in other ways - they do not bully LGBTQ+ people, girls, people of colour, etc., nearly as much as previous generations.  
I don't see a negative trend - rather I see older people viewing the past through rose-coloured glasses.

traveller

8/11/2018 11:40:01 AM
Member since:
Jun 2007
Total posts:9059
:)

  
acidbasement said "I guess what I was going for was that respect is more than "manners". Kids today may be more likely to call you a familiar name, as opposed to Mr. or Mrs., but they are also a lot more courteous than previous generations in other ways - they do not bully LGBTQ+ people, girls, people of colour, etc., nearly as much as previous generations.  
I don't see a negative trend - rather I see older people viewing the past through rose-coloured glasses. "

you have a very good point and that was somewhat what i was getting at (you said it better) times are changing but not all of the changes are bad.  
 
Even tho younger generations are valuing different things many of their values are values good kind people possess, even if the elderly dont see it because they are hung up on the exterior perception of what makes someone a good person, you may like someone to call you MR or Ms but really does that REALLY matter?

RichardL

8/11/2018 1:44:39 PM
Member since:
Aug 2012
Total posts:31
italics

Since when did writing in italics become a thing?

Mr. Brett

8/12/2018 10:43:20 AM
Member since:
Jul 2018
Total posts:61
Mhmm

Ah ha. I was wondering when a social justice warrior was going to make an appearance. Turning topics of simple respect and courtesy in to issues of gender and racial struggle/acceptance. Yeah sure, kids today are totally fine if you're queer, or pan-whatever, or trans-mission, and every color of the rain-bow, great. But on too many saddening occasions have I see kids laugh/make fun of adults/older adults. Be it from their physical appearance, clothing, mannerisms, or simple behaviors  
Ex.: "Look at that guy, he took his hat off to greet someone" - *That's an example, not a real one*  
So hooray if they love anything that's attracted to everything, and prefer multi-colored anything. I'm not saying I do or don't. But that level of acceptance isn't enough, when those same kids have zero respect and admiration for the people who provide(d) for them.  
Even back when I was in school, I remember a few kids referring to their parents as "r***rds" or a "piece of s**t" because they didn't buy them some silly thing they wanted. Well who's raising that? Get freaked out by a homo-sexual and it's treason, but talk that way about your parents and it's nothing? I don't think so  
 
Edited by Mr. Brett, 2018-08-12 10:44:39

KSG

8/12/2018 2:42:08 PM
Member since:
Dec 2016
Total posts:12
social justice?

Pretty sure respect and courtesy go hand in hand with acceptance and racial and identity issues. Why? Because that’s the world we live in today and kids have more to be aware of than just using Mr. Ms. or Mrs. You want to be referred to by kids a certain way and that’s cool. However society and cultures change. So if a teacher prefers to be referred to by their first name that’s totally fine and that’s their own choice.  
 
Instead of teaching children to refer to people how you want to be referred to, teach and encourage them to ask, understand and refer to people how different individuals prefer to be referred to.  
 
Also I personally find it hard to respect someone who has to demand it. Demand and earning are different. And in this day the virtue of simply being older doesn’t always entitle you to the respect and acknowledgment you desire.  
 
Society is moving online. Texting and messages are the normal. If someone prefers a text over a face to face or phone call that should be respected as much as your desire for the other.

Mr. Brett

8/12/2018 3:45:16 PM
Member since:
Jul 2018
Total posts:61
Ok, For Sure

I like the direction you took your response, and I agree, to a point. It's all choice, and I am for it, essentially. Prefer to wear no shoes, prefer to be called "Slugger" rather than "Mister So-And-So", prefer stupid ridiculous rain-bow skinny jeans fine. I am ALL FOR IT, if it's in return, which is usally where the buck stops, in my life experience anyway.  
But what got me, and what I want to respond on is this:  
 
Call V.S. a text, let's say. I'm supposed to respect their preference, and they should respect mine. But here's where that goes out the window for me: When I'm selling something, and my ads say "No E-Mails", and I still get e-mails, and people saying ""here's my number, text me"  
NO. I'm the seller, you want my item, you respect my preference and call me. If you want it, you have to go after it. Don't leave me some number and assume I'm capable of texting. Because I tell you, I'm not  
That right there is what drives me bonkers about people

MrDobalina

8/12/2018 4:27:35 PM
Member since:
Jun 2017
Total posts:259
why does everyone care so much?

  
Mr. Brett said "Ah ha. I was wondering when a social justice warrior was going to make an appearance. Turning topics of simple respect and courtesy in to issues of gender and racial struggle/acceptance. Yeah sure, kids today are totally fine if you're queer, or pan-whatever, or trans-mission, and every color of the rain-bow, great. But on too many saddening occasions have I see kids laugh/make fun of adults/older adults. Be it from their physical appearance, clothing, mannerisms, or simple behaviors  
Ex.: "Look at that guy, he took his hat off to greet someone" - *That's an example, not a real one*  
So hooray if they love anything that's attracted to everything, and prefer multi-colored anything. I'm not saying I do or don't. But that level of acceptance isn't enough, when those same kids have zero respect and admiration for the people who provide(d) for them.  
Even back when I was in school, I remember a few kids referring to their parents as "r***rds" or a "piece of s**t" because they didn't buy them some silly thing they wanted. Well who's raising that? Get freaked out by a homo-sexual and it's treason, but talk that way about your parents and it's nothing? I don't think so  
 
Edited by Mr. Brett, 2018-08-12 10:44:39"

So what if a kids rude, or someone doesn't take their hat off when they go inside a restaurant or say excuse me when they fart? Be disgusted, avoid the places where these heathens congregate...It's not 1934 anymore...people are free to do as they please and if that behaviour offends too many people then those people will find themselves eating alone or socially isolated.

Never been

8/12/2018 5:26:00 PM
Member since:
Jul 2010
Total posts:468
Mr. Brett

“Yeah sure, kids today are totally fine if you're queer, or pan-whatever, or trans-mission, and every color of the rain-bow, great. But on too many saddening occasions have I see kids laugh/make fun of adults/older adults. Be it from their physical appearance, clothing, mannerisms, or simple behaviors”. Ok... You say it’s sad that kids “make fun” of older adults, but it’s ok for you to ignorantly refer to kids today as Queer, pan-whatever, or trans-missiom? You want kids to refer to you respectively as “Mr.” but you turn around and tell them they are wearing “stupid ridiculous rain-bow skinny jeans”? Um, no. Respect is a 2 way street!! I think millennials are teaching the older generation better tolerance for others. Unfortunately, I think your post makes it clear that better tolerance for others has not rubbed off you. My hope is that kids now a days would stand up to you and call you what you are: a racist, homophobic bully. Respect if earned, not assumed.

KSG

8/12/2018 6:18:44 PM
Member since:
Dec 2016
Total posts:12
again, Mr Brett,

You seem to keep displaying your disdain for others you view as different. Why refer to them as someone who wears skinny rainbow jeans ? Clothing is one of the easiest things to accept as no matter your race, culture, identity or preferences: anyone can wear anything they want. I wear bright clothes often. Am I to assume others are judging or labelling me?  
 
It’s simple treat others as you wish to be treated. Teach and encourage respect and acceptance. Promote learning, understanding and empathy for all.  
 
And really? You are literally on a forum/medium which is online and based on text chat and messaging and are expecting to receive voice calls only? Two way street: those whom you are trying to sell to don’t owe you anything and you don’t owe them. You’re providing each other a service. Not all of us are able to make or receive calls during working hours and sometimes a text or email is all that is possible. Being said others prefer voice which is fine. Cooperate and work something out.

traveller

8/12/2018 7:37:46 PM
Member since:
Jun 2007
Total posts:9059
:)

I always thought real old fashioned respect also didnt judge, openly at least. People with manners were composed, kind and treated everyone with dignity no matter what their beliefs or clothes they wore ended up being, whether they were social warriors or not their views were not openly mocked.  
 
on the same lines as KSG said teach people how you would like to be treated by example and hopefully they follow suit but, if they dont be kind and, dont sink to a level you dont want to be in, personally i strive to realize my way isnt the only way, sometimes i do fail tho lol  
 
My advise is dont worry about what others do, weather they have respect as you view it or not, just demonstrate what you believe is right, and if you dont want emails and buyers email just hit delete, seriously

Tater

8/14/2018 11:43:54 AM
Member since:
Jul 2013
Total posts:367

 
 
Edited by Tater, 2018-08-14 11:46:50

ram1952

8/14/2018 2:02:08 PM
Member since:
Mar 2017
Total posts:58
As a senior I may be a bit

old fashion but I believe that when a young person is addressing an adult - out of respect they should use their surname with either Mr., Mrs., Miss. or Ms. in front of same - Unless instructed otherwise by the adult. We are a very diversed country with many immigrants whose last names are real tongue twisters, in this case I think you will still be respectful if you use Dr., Mrs., Mr. in front of their first name. Respect comes in many forms, It would be nice if the young people would show respect for the people around them whether they are old or young. I don't come to Brandon very often but when I do, it seems that whenever there are 2 or 3 teenagers together they use foul language extensively when talking amongst themselves - it doesn't matter whether its in a store, restaurant or parking lot. They should respect the people around them who are not interested in listening to the barrage of 4 letter words they know. Before some of you jump all over me - Yes I have used a lot of those 4 letter words but not in a public place - mainly in the barn during milking time - which I's sure a lot of retired farmers can relate to.


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Computer Problems?
Years of experience, combined with certification by product manufacturers and industry standard organizations, have made our technicians among the finest in the Brandon & Westman area. myITsource.ca and Frank's Computers has earned a reputation for quality performance and expert knowledge. More..