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Topic: camera lens
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DogLover23

4/18/2017 11:08:25 AM
Member since:
Oct 2010
Total posts:322
camera lens

Can someone please educate me on what is the best starter lens to get for a canon camera

Adam

4/18/2017 11:15:24 AM
Member since:
Aug 2008
Total posts:14852
Lens

What kind of shooting do you expect to be doing?

DogLover23

4/18/2017 12:51:18 PM
Member since:
Oct 2010
Total posts:322
mainly

Portrait type pictures starting up a photography business

Marpet

4/18/2017 1:18:35 PM
Member since:
Jun 2007
Total posts:522
Sounds like you have a bit of work ahead.

There are many resources online.  
 
https://www.dpreview.com/ does reviews of all different types of equipment.  
 
Standard portrait lens is around 85 to 100 mm but will vary wildly with other equipment.  
 
Good luck  
 
Marpet

Randy Shand

4/18/2017 1:29:45 PM
Member since:
Mar 2007
Total posts:186
Canon Type

The type of Canon you are using also should be taken into consideration. If you google your camera model and "best lens for portraits" you should come up with some valuable resources. Good luck and good shooting.

DogLover23

4/18/2017 8:11:31 PM
Member since:
Oct 2010
Total posts:322
mm

What exactly does the mm mean

summergal

4/18/2017 8:55:40 PM
Member since:
May 2009
Total posts:1418
....

  
DogLover23 said "What exactly does the mm mean "

It means millimetre.  
 
 
I'd would suggest before starting a photography business that you take some photography classes and take lots of pictures first. You can't just buy a DSLR and immediately take good photos, there is lots to learn.

Wrenchturner

4/18/2017 10:27:10 PM
Member since:
Jul 2016
Total posts:17
I hope

You realize there's more to just owning "a nice camera" to start up a Photography biz. I can't buy some tools and call myself an electrician. I hope you plan on taking some courses etc

Trevor B

4/18/2017 11:19:59 PM
Member since:
Apr 2005
Total posts:7472
There's

a camera club in Brandon.  
 
http://www.brandoncameraclub.ca/

InfinitiGirl

4/19/2017 7:52:38 AM
Member since:
Nov 2007
Total posts:831
Recommendation...

I would recommend taking some courses at ACC - they are offered to the public (for a fee) and cover photography basics as well as different styles of photography. If you complete all of the courses you are issued a certificate.  
 
There is a lot that goes into starting a "photography business"  
 
You''ll need to know your camera. mm is the milimetere sizes for your lenses. Most cameras come stock with an 18-55 mm lens. It''s good for quick shots and your every day basics. I use a 35mm & 80mm lens for portraits. These can run you anywhere from $300+ depending on auto focus options, and whether its a f1.2 or f1.8. The smaller the f number, the more expensive your lens will be. You''ll also need to learn how to set your camera based on the light around you.  
 
You are also going to need to invest in something like photoshop & lightroom. Not always the easiest programs to use, but great once you learn how. They cost 10$ a month for the adobe creative cloud, or you can outright purchase them, which is what most photographers do.  
 
There is a lot of competition with amazing photographers in Brandon that have done it for years. I would recommend getting a basic camera kit (like the Canon Rebel Series if Canon is what you want to go with) and register yourself for the courses at ACC. Otherwise, I don''t see it being a successful business. (Sorry if that''s a little blunt)  
 
Edited by InfinitiGirl, 2017-04-19 07:56:22

DogLover23

4/19/2017 11:27:46 AM
Member since:
Oct 2010
Total posts:322
classes

I have taken classes.

DogLover23

4/19/2017 11:30:13 AM
Member since:
Oct 2010
Total posts:322
I'm

Just looking for some extra help since I'm just starting it

DogLover23

4/19/2017 11:30:33 AM
Member since:
Oct 2010
Total posts:322
i

Have done lots of practicing and worked lots with Lightroom

DogLover23

4/19/2017 11:30:54 AM
Member since:
Oct 2010
Total posts:322
everyone

Has to start somewhere

Marpet

4/19/2017 12:24:22 PM
Member since:
Jun 2007
Total posts:522
Dont let anyone discourage you from chasing your goal...

...but have to agree that some of the questions asked are very basic. Again, there are many resources available online with the best being Youtube.  
 
Search Photography for beginners and watch a tonne of videos.  
 
Marpet

L4593

4/19/2017 12:51:31 PM
Member since:
May 2008
Total posts:465

When purchasing lenses, I first specify what my budget is and then search within those parameters. Also make sure you know exactly what mount your camera takes and whether you "need" to have IS or will you be using a tripod only? I will spend hours online researching and reading reviews of different lenses. Have you decided if you will be wanting a prime lens and what type of photos you will be specializing in? Such as in-studio or outdoor only images? Single person or group photos? There are so many factors that come into play when buying a lens and no one lens can do everything, so having two or three may be required. Another question to ask yourself, is what lens will fit your style of photography? Is bokeh quality something you are striving for? Here is a link on choosing what lens(es) could work for what you want it for, but again, there are hundreds of sites that discuss this as well: https://www.borrowlenses.com/blog/best-portrait-lens/  
 
I am hoping that you have also done some market analysis of the westman area to see if another photographer is even feasible. Unless of course, you are just choosing to do this pro bono and aren't expecting to make a living off of it.

DogLover23

4/19/2017 1:50:59 PM
Member since:
Oct 2010
Total posts:322
hobby

Oh no with so many great photographers out there this is more or less a hobby I want to be good at I've done lots of google research just just got over whelmed by it all and was hoping to be steered into the right direction of what more to look for

Des

4/19/2017 2:43:09 PM
Member since:
Nov 2007
Total posts:103
Practice, practice, practice

I have been pursuing photography as a hobby for close to 30 years now. My first really good camera was a Nikon FM. It was completely manual. I had to set the shutter speed and depth of field using a basic light meter. I learned so much that now, even when I do use program on my semi-pro DSLR, I find myself dissatisfied with the results and switching back to manual or aperture priority.  
 
The best thing you can do when you start is invest in a mid range DSLR (don't go with the cheapest and you definitely don't need the most expensive) and pick up either the kit lens or just get a simple 50mm lens.  
 
Then, either follow a book, take a course at ACC, or do some on-line courses and practice. Learn how to freeze action with a fast shutter speed, or how to blur a waterfall or running stream with a slow shutter speed. Then work on depth of field. Note how a wide open aperture (e.g. F1.8 or F3.5) results in a shallow depth of field with only the main subject in focus and the background and foreground blurred. See how a small aperture like F16 gives you a much larger range of focus.  
 
Figure out how your meter works and how ISO changes the apertures and shutter speeds you can use. Learn the limits of your camera by seeing how the ISO can affect image quality.  
 
Ultimately, any camera is a box for capturing light. You have to learn to think about the light, as much as the image.  
 
Learn to frame your subject. Recognize that a great photo doesn't always have the person in the middle. Learn the rule of thirds.  
 
Learn when to use a tripod and when you can get away without it.  
 
I suggest getting a midrange camera only because as your skills grow, you will quickly realize that there are limits imposed by the camera and, in today's world, when you buy a camera you are also buying a sensor with its own limits. In the old days, you could always buy better film. Now you have to buy a whole new camera. Therefore, buy a mid range DSLR which will last you a few years and which you can grow with. Once you feel you have the hang of it, spend more money on lenses. Lenses will last you forever if you take care of them and they are always a better investment than the camera.  
 
As you learn, you will also realize that you need different lenses for different types of photography. For sports you want a long lens, with a fast aperture. For portraits you want a 80 or 100mm lens. For landscapes you want a 24 or 35mm lens.  
 
Also, when you buy your camera, you have to realize that the physical size of the sensor makes a difference. Full frame refers to a sensor which is the same dimensions of a 35mm film frame. Most mid range and lower cameras use an APC sized sensor, meaning the actual size is smaller. Don't confuse sensor size with megapixels. They are two different things. But sensor size can affect which lenses you can use. Also, more megapixels doesn't necessarily mean a better image. There are trade offs.  
 
This is a hobby which is expensive, technical, but extremely rewarding. There is much to learn but the best thing you can do is practice, read, and learn from others. The beauty of digital is that its instant and you can take unlimited pictures. Film cost money to buy and process and couldn't be re-used, but it forced you to think about every single shot to make the most of it.  
 
After years of practice and learning photography, some day you may even be good enough to make money at it. But don't think that just buying a good camera will make you a good photographer.  
 
Good luck and enjoy.

Randy Shand

4/19/2017 3:27:46 PM
Member since:
Mar 2007
Total posts:186
RAW vs Jpeg

There have been some very good informative and knowledgeable posts in this thread. Good advice. One more thing I would like to add is how important the file format you shoot in is. Most DSLR cameras allow for shooting in Jpeg and/or RAW formats. I strongly encourage you to pursue RAW format as your file format. Do some research on this. The end results are far more superior to Jpeg and the flexibility of RAW in post processing will bring so much more out of the photos you shoot. Good luck

DogLover23

4/19/2017 5:11:30 PM
Member since:
Oct 2010
Total posts:322
camera

I have invested in a good quality camera already and have learned the basics. I always shoot in raw thanks for all the advice

 
 
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